Can you help me represent Desmarchais Crawford?

I’d appreciate your help. During the municipal election on Sunday, November 5,  I’m going to ask residents of Desmarchais Crawford to vote me in as their representative in Verdun. To make it happen, I need voters, donors and volunteers.

My Team

Jean-Francois Parenteau, the mayor of Verdun, has recruited me to run as borough councillor of Demarchais/Crawford. This means I am now part of the Denis Coderre team. It also means I get to work closely with Marie-Eve Brunet and Ann Guy. Whoo hoo! These are people I adore.  Here’s a story from our local newspaper about our campaign: http://journalmetro.com/local/verdun/actualites/1165758/remaniement-dequipe-parenteau-pour-conquerir-desmarchais-crawford/.

It’s thrilling to get the opportunity to work within local government to promote Montreal as a resilient city that builds abundance by protecting the planet, treating people well, and helping businesses profit. Applying for the job of representing my friends and neighbours in an administration that recognizes Verdun’s strengths is such an honour.

Vote

If you live in the sector of Verdun between Riel Street and LaSalle, please go out and vote for me on November 5th. If you know someone in that area, ask them to vote for me please!

If you live elsewhere in Quebec, please vote anyway. Check whether you’re on the list at the Directeur général des élections du Québec website, http://www.electionsquebec.qc.ca/english/.

If you live in other provinces, you can still help by donating, volunteering or just cheering me on! Thanks so much for your support.

Donate

It’s an election year so you can donate up to $200 to one or many candidates in your municipality. That includes me if you live in Montreal. If you live outside of Montreal, you can donate up to $25.

Here’s my donation page: https://equipedeniscoderre.com/candidate.php?contact_id=93

Volunteer to help with the campaign

My plan is to go door-to-door eight hours every week from now until September 22 and pretty much daily after that. I need someone to accompany me for each of those hours to write down whether the person I just spoke to is likely to vote for me or not. I’ll be caught up in the discussion and people are nice, so I’ve found it’s impossible to read their body language properly. If this is something you can do, please let me know.

Once the election gets going, our team will need people to help to put up posters, phone people, seek donations, and tons of other tasks.

If you can help, please email me at writer (at symbol) traceyarial.com.

Volunteer to help with one of my other projects

You don’t like politics or you support another candidate for the job? That’s okay. You can still join the movement for a more resilient city by joining CAUS, helping with our markets or participating in Grand Potager.

CAUS is a non-profit solidarity coop that promotes abundance in Verdun via farmers markets, aquaponics, hydroponics, composting and micro-green production. We’re now looking for consumer members. In exchange for purchasing one $10 share in our company, consumer members get discounts, occasional give-aways and the opportunity to contribute to Verdun and Montreal resiliency. You can get a consumer membership at our markets, which take place three times a week in Verdun:

  • The Verdun waterfront farmers’ market take place Sundays between noon and 4 p.m. from July 2 until October 4, 2017 on the waterfront south of LaSalle Blvd. between 4th and 5th avenues near Crescendo and the children’s park.
  • The Verdun library farmers’ market takes place Wednesdays between 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. from July 5 until October 4, 2017 in front of the Cultural Centre and Library of Verdun, 5955 Bannantyne.
  • The Verdun Wellington market takes place Fridays between 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. from July 7 until September 29, 2017 on Wellington Street at the corner of Galt.

We also need lots of volunteers. Between now and Thanksgiving, we need people to count visitors and help put up and take down tents before and after every market on Wednesdays and Sundays.

  • On Wednesdays, we need people from 2 until 3 to put up tents and set up tables from 3:30 until 7:30, to count visitors from 3:30 until 7:30, and to take tents down from 7:30 until 8:30.
  • On Sundays, we need people to put up tents from 10:30 until 11:30, to count visitors from noon until 4 p.m. and to take tents down and put tables away from 4 until 5 p.m.

CAUS is also a member of Grand Potager, which is the OBNL that animates urban agriculture at Verdun’s municipal greenhouses. CAUS will open a garden supply and market products kiosk there soon to sell market products, micro-green seeds and a new compost and seed lawn rejuvenation package. We’ll also offer urban agriculture workshops soon. You can also sponsor Grand Potager itself in exchange for a message on a fruit tree in the jardin d’hiver.

Let me know if any of these projects interest you, and I’ll put you on the appropriate newsletter.

Thanks for everything.

Hugs,

Tracey

 

Floods join stories about Crawford Bridge School, construction etc.

Floods are on everyone’s mind right now. My heart goes out to people in Rigaud, Ile Mercier and Ile Bizard,who were ordered to evacuate. Also, there are many homes in Ste. Anne’s, Pierrefonds,  Laval and Dorval whose homes are flooded.

Mayor Denis Coderre just called a state of emergency in Montreal after three dikes collapsed in the Pierrefonds-Roxboro borough near Rivieres des Prairies. There have been 221 homes evacuated so far.

There are 400 soldiers on duty in Quebec now to help fill sandbags. Another 800 are on their way.

Laval police are also helping to handle the emergency situation as I outlined in my story the Suburban.

In last week’s Suburban, I also wrote about the Crawford Park School consultation, bridge frustrations and an entrepreneur event and several other police operations in Laval.

Here are all the stories:

Crawford Park School consultation underway again (C, May 3, pA9)

Lachine, LaSalle, Mercier Bridge Construction (C, May3, pA19)

Laval Joins Relay for Life June 10 (L, May 3, pA1)

Public Senior Residences Hold Bazaars Next Weekend (L, May 3, pA13)

Four Police Services Cooperate in Synergie Operation (L, May 3, pA13)

Police spokespeople attend training last week (L, May 3, pA14)

Juliette Brun headlines Second Annual Entrepreneur Celebration (L, May 3, pA15)

 

In the April 26 issue of the Suburban

I have more stories than usual in last week’s Suburban. Most of my stories are in the West Island and Laval issues. I’m particularly impressed with the first one about the event Wednesday night.

Inspirational women raise money for women shelter  (WI,Apr26,pA6)

Lachine transfers human resources to Mtl (WI,Apr26,pA9)

On Rock faces incredible use surge (WI,Apr26,pA14)

Jean-Pierre Menard to speak to CSSS Laval (L,Apr26,pA3)

Demers to pitch Laval (L,Apr27,pA3)

Police donate $46,000 to trauma victims

Last week’s April 19 Edition:

Emergency crews on standby for flood (Laval, April 19, A1),

Children in Pierrefonds celebrate Montreal (WI, April 19, A6)

UPS to expand Lachine plant (WI, April 19, A11)

Backyard shed thieves caught red handed (Laval, April 19, A1)

Laval to benefit from Plattsburgh Montreal (Laval, April 19, A3)

 

Did you know Library and Archives Canada has a podcast?

The latest Library and Archives Canada podcast just came out April 7. It features the rise of the British Flying Service and how that new technology affected the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

In the early days of flight, you had to expect to crash,” says Bill Rawling, historian and author of the book Surviving Trench Warfare and one of the experts interviewed in the podcast. “And the idea was to see how far, how high you could go before the aircraft would fall out of the sky and they’d have to drag you out of the wreckage. Now, you’re talking about something that when it crashes, you’re going 30 kilometres an hour and you’ve come down from 30 feet and it’s all wood and canvas and it just falls apart around you. And in fact, it’s like a big crunch zone in a car. So, but yeah. You have to expect—Billy Bishop, you know, probably Canada’s most famous pilot ever, when they adopt new aircraft—the Nieuport 17—there were hard landings, as they were called, as he’s learning how to operate this aircraft. And a hard landing may well mean damage. So how many of these hard landings were actually crashes?”

If you have an ancestor who served in the British or Canadian military, this episode will give you lots of ideas of their roles during the war. It also features descriptions of some of the other experts who participated in this, the world’s first industrial war.

This is the first of two podcasts featuring Vimy. The Episode is called Beyond Vimy: The Rise of Air Power, Part 1.

Library and Archives Canada Podcasts Appealing to Genealogists

The Library and Archives Canada  has been podcasting since 2012. Other episodes that might appeal to genealogists include:

 Sifting through LAC’s Cookbook Collection

Hiding in Plain Sight: The Métis Nation

And perhaps the most useful one for any genealogist,

Digging Into the Past: Family History in Canada

To see the entire collection, refer to the main podcast page.

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